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2010 Earth Workshops
 

More than 70 Earth Workshops were held in Turin during Terra Madre 2010. These meetings of the world meeting of food communities were hosted at the Oval Olympic building, and in some cases, the nearby Lingotto.
Fishers, breeders, farmers, researchers and cooks of Terra Madre discussed various issues linked to sustainable agriculture and the future of resources, sharing experiences and proposing solutions. In the regional meetings scheduled for Saturday October 23, delegates compared their different experiences in common territories and discussed potential common projects.

Once again, as in the previous edition of Terra Madre, visitors to the Salone del Gusto were also able to participate in the Earth Workshops.



2010 EARTH WORKSHOPS PROGRAM

Friday, october 22
Saturday, october 23
Sunday, october 24


FRIDAY, OCTOBER 22

10.00 ROOM A
FOOD POLICIES 1 - SOCIAL SYSTEMS AND TRANSFORMATIONS
Students and teachers from the Advanced School on Food Policies and Sustainability and the Terra Madre food communities discuss the draft document for policy-makers written during the course. In this workshop we will frame historical questions about the production, distribution and consumption of food since 1492 within the development of class-structured societies and in relation to different geopolitical scales: the body, home/family, community, city, region, nation and world/global. The seminar’s ultimate goal will be to understand change in food production, distribution and consumption in relation to social change.


10.00 ROOM B
FOOD POLICIES 2 - ENERGY AND SYSTEMIC PRODUCTION
Students and teachers from the Advanced School on Food Policies and Sustainability and the Terra Madre food communities discuss the draft document for policy-makers written during the course. In this workshop, in addition to sharing the outcomes of the work conducted by students, discussion will focus on understanding what actions stakeholders must take in the field of energy and systemic production systems.


10.00 ROOM C
FOOD POLICIES 3 - BIODIVERSITY AND ECOSYSTEMS
Students and teachers from the Advanced School on Food Policies and Sustainability and the Terra Madre food communities discuss the draft document for policy-makers written during the course. In this workshop the discussion will focus on understanding the functions of biodiversity within the ecological realm as the basis for providing information that helps farmers and policy-makers bring about a more sustainable agriculture model.


10.00 ROOM D
FOOD POLICIES 4 - GOODS, EXCHANGES AND SHARED RESOURCES
Students and teachers from the Advanced School on Food Policies and Sustainability and the Terra Madre food communities discuss the draft document for policy-makers written during the course. This workshop will deal with the relationship between ethics and the economy, the shared responsibility of producers and consumers and the construction of a new concept of quality for food, environment and people.


10.00 ROOM E
FOOD POLICIES 5 - LAW, RIGHTS AND POLICIES
Students and teachers from the Advanced School on Food Policies and Sustainability and the Terra Madre food communities discuss the draft document for policy-makers written during the course. In this workshop the discussion will focus on the legal implications underpinning food policies and on the promotion of a human rights-based approach in developing and implementing such policies.


10.00 ROOM F
FOOD POLICIES 6 - SUSTAINABLE EDUCATION
Students and teachers from the Advanced School on Food Policies and Sustainability and the Terra Madre food communities discuss the draft document for policy-makers written during the course. This workshop will look at the key issues identified by the group as key to sustainable education, such as its characteristics, methods, actors, co-actors and priorities, with specific reference to the subject of food choices.


10.00 ROOM G
FOOD POLICIES 7 - TRADITIONAL KNOWLEDGE, GENDER, AND IMMATERIAL VALUES
Students and teachers from the Advanced School on Food Policies and Sustainability and the Terra Madre food communities discuss the draft document for policy-makers written during the course. In this workshop, the debate will deal with the relationship between food, gender and intangible heritage. Food will be the key to thinking about and discussing the protection and promotion of traditional knowledge belonging to the cultural and production systems of local communities.


10.00 ROOM H
FOOD POLICIES 8 - PLEASURE AND WELL-BEING
Students and teachers from the Advanced School on Food Policies and Sustainability and the Terra Madre food communities discuss the draft document for policy-makers written during the course. In this workshop we will broaden the issue of sustainable food pleasure when it comes to diet and well-being: How can we define a sustainable diet? What role is played by governments, institution and policies? We will try to outline an educational system aimed at sustainable taste awareness.


10.00 ROOM LINGUA MADRE
THE LANGUAGE OF THE EARTH
What happens when indigenous languages speak of agriculture? Terra Madre 2010 is open to the dialects of the different communities present at the event, letting them resound around the general assembly. From this came the idea of using indigenous languages as a starting point for reconsidering practices linked to the land, long the cornerstone of Terra Madre, in an attempt to discover new meanings and connections with other aspects of local cultures.
Report

10.00 SPAZIO GIOVANI
IDENTITIES AND GLOBALIZATION OF DIVERSITY
There is increasingly recurrent debate about the role that young people can have within the global and globalized economy that characterizes contemporary society. What systems can be put into place to preserve a regional identity and a link between people and individuals, while at the same time continuing to use global communication systems?

Report

13.00 SALA AVORIO - LINGOTTO
NATIVE WOOLS
Italian farmers don't consider sheep wools as a resource any more. Professional shearers are more and more hired: they often come from abroad and the price paid is higher than the proceeds of the wool sale. The alternative to sale is the disposal as special waste. Biella producers' association proposes to small farmers to turn italian breed wool into a resource, starting from Presidia.

14.00 ROOM A
FOOD SAFETY AND FOOD DIVERSITY
The recent reforms in agricultural policy have confirmed that attention is moving from production quantity to production quality. Nevertheless, before tackling the quality issue, food safety must be taken into consideration. The excellent quality of a product means nothing if it cannot be consumed safely. Safety and quality are not incompatible and hygiene legislation is flexible enough to meet the needs of all entrepreneurs at SMEs and local levels.
In collaboration with the European Commission, DG Health and Consumers.

15.00 ROOM B
NEW CERTIFICATION MODELS: PARTICIPATORY SYSTEMS
Organic food production involves certification, but methods can vary. Participatory guarantee systems (PGS) offer certification models for small-scale producers who target local markets. The bureaucracy of large-scale certification systems is replaced by a social network that unites to guarantee products for producers and consumers.
This workshop will look at different experiences and approaches to PGS. In collaboration with AIAB, the Italian association for organic agriculture.


15.00 ROOM C
FAMILY AGRICULTURE REFUSES GMOS
Agriculture on a family scale does not need GMOs to produce the food necessary to meet needs. However the multinationals that control the GMO market often target traditional agriculture as a source of new varieties to use in their crosses, using forms of bio-piracy as legal as they are unfair. A meeting to assess the situation and identify the best methods of resistance.

Report

15.00 ROOM D
NETWORKS MEET: TERRA MADRE FISHERS

Report

15.00 ROOM E
ORGANIC, SUSTAINABLE AND FAIR FARMING
Organic agriculture is not just a farming method, but also a cultural approach, a concrete and positive reference point for defining a sustainable economy model. The annual meeting of Città del Bio, a network bringing together over 170 municipalities in Italy and Europe, will be held this year at Terra Madre, offering the chance to compare experiences and knowledge between the networks. In collaboration with Città del Bio.

15.00 ROOM F
NETWORKS MEET: TERRA MADRE TRADITIONAL RICE GROWERS
In recent years, many rice-producing countries have produced less than in the past and some governments have banned the export of certain traditional varieties to protect the domestic market. Slow Food’s aim is to bring together traditional rice growers to focus attention on the importance of local production, which favors family consumption, safeguards seed conservation and creates local markets, with the aim of preserving the biodiversity of rice and its rich cultural and spiritual heritage.

Report

15.00 ROOM G
HONEY AND BEES
In the International Year of Biodiversity, the bee, the very symbol of biodiversity, is at risk. Governments, particularly in rich countries, are taking too long to implement effective measures to save the bees. The decline of bee populations and beekeeping has become an apparently unstoppable global phenomenon, but the example of some countries, like Italy, shows that it is possible to reverse the trend. Beekeepers from around the world will meet to seek solutions and new models.

Report

15.00 ROOM H
SETTING AND COMMUNICATING FAIR PRICES
The real cost of a product does not come just from production costs, but also from other indirect costs, which are not always clear to the producer. Complying with the market by only asking the price the consumer expects is not always the best system. Producers must learn to properly calculate costs, and if the buyer understands the process, the final price can be advantageous for the consumer too. In any case greater clarity encourages a greater willingness from consumers to recognize the value of more sustainable production practices.



SATURDAY, OCTOBER 23

10.00 ROOM LINGUA MADRE
SMALL-SCALE PRODUCERS: REGULATIONS, CRISES AND OPPORTUNITIES
Small-scale production represents an economy’s real driving force. It is imperative that the production activities of all actors are regulated with specific rules based on the real needs and real perils for different business sizes. A proper regulatory approach must protect big businesses but also be able to identify new paradigms for small-scale producers, who have a lower capacity and margin for reaction and action. Focus on direct sell, hygiene and first transformation.



10.00 SPAZIO GIOVANI
LIVING SLOW: A PATH FOR CHANGE
What role can new generations play within the food system? How can they make the most of their skills in technological innovation and identify the best alternatives among those offered by the various models for sustainable development? A meeting to discuss the importance of exchange between generations and what each of us can do to encourage and protect it.

Report


REGIONAL MEETINGS
10.00 ROOM A Asia Report
10.00 ROOM B Mexico, Central America and the Caribbean Report
10.00 ROOM C Canada Report
10.00 ROOM D Russian-Speaking Eastern Europe Report
10.00 ROOM E USA Report
10.00 ROOM F Italy
10.00 ROOM G German-Speaking Countries
10.00 ROOM H Arabic-Speaking Countries
11.00 SALA AVORIO - LINGOTTO Republic of South Africa Report
13.00 ROOM A Australia/Oceania Report
13.00 ROOM B Brazil Report
13.00 ROOM C Austria Report
13.00 ROOM D Japan Report
13.00 ROOM E The Netherlands/Switzerland
13.00 ROOM F Swahili-Speaking Countries: Kenya, Tanzania, Uganda
13.00 ROOM G Germany Report
13.00 ROOM H Sweden
15.00 ROOM A Africa
15.00 ROOM B South America
15.00 ROOM C Europe: Nordic Countries Report
15.00 ROOM D English-Speaking Eastern Europe Report
15.00 ROOM E Spain
15.00 ROOM F France - Report
15.00 ROOM G Ireland/India Report
15.00 ROOM H The United Kingdom Report


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 24

10.00 ROOM A
FAIR-TRADE AND LOCAL MARKETS: THE COMMODIFICATION OF JUSTICE
What opportunities does the world of fair trade offer, and what changes does it need to see? Begun in the West as a way of trading with developing countries, it’s time for fair-trade to take a look at its own backyard.

Report

10.00 ROOM B
SLOW FOOD IN THE CANTEEN
How can we improve what’s served every day in schools and guarantee access to good, clean and fair food? There are many initiatives organized at a European level to pass correct food habits and the pleasure of food onto new generations, but the process is extremely complex. Food and taste education, the participation of local communities, working in a network and an awareness of the mechanisms that underlie public food service are the first steps that need to be taken towards the hoped-for change.
This seminar is part of the “European Schools for Healthy Food” project promoted by Slow Food and funded by the European Commission's Directorate-General for Agriculture and Rural Development, which involves 10 European countries (Italy, France, Belgium, the United Kingdom, Ireland, Spain, Poland, Romania, Bulgaria and Latvia) in a campaign to promote the consumption of healthy and fresh food in schools and provide information on the relevant support from the CAP, in particular through the European School Fruit Scheme.

Report

10.00 ROOM C
THE ROLE OF RESEARCH IN THE CREATION OF A NEW FOOD SYSTEM
Universities and research have long had a significant role within society, both laying the foundations for the introduction of new innovations and technologies and shaping people’s knowledge and skills. What should a university’s role be and what are the best models for teaching the principles of good, clean and fair within an academic environment?

Report

10.00 ROOM D
NETWORKS MEET: TERRA MADRE INDIGENOUS PEOPLES
Report

10.00 ROOM E
AN INTRODUCTION TO SOCIAL ENTERPRISES
A new production model brings together food production and the disadvantaged, for example those with mental illnesses or the differently abled. A number of farms, restaurants and food transformation systems are offering social organizations the possibility of carrying out agricultural activity programs that actively involve the people they work with. The initiative endorses the value of manual work, brings in new business administration, allows social integration and gives autonomy to people with disabilities.

Report

10.00 ROOM F
LESS MEAT, BETTER MEAT
Every breed is the result of a complex evolutionary process linked to infinite interconnected aspects. A native breed certainly reflects the perfect equilibrium between animal and place, but the quality of the meat produced is strongly affected by every outside influence (environmental, dietary, managerial) which conditions the expression of its genetic potential. Meat production is a demanding process which today requires attention to animal welfare, environmental impact, consumer protection and energy waste.

Report

10.00 ROOM G
THE GRANARIES OF MEMORY
Memory is an intangible heritage for humanity, on the verge of disappearance. To respond to this anthropological emergency, which concerns the knowledge of oral cultures, the Manifesto on the Future of Knowledge Systems has been drawn up and will be presented here at Terra Madre. The project “Granaries of memory” has also been launched to collect, conserve and protect the precious intangible heritage passed on by our forebears.
Report

10.00 ROOM H
COOKS AND PLACES
A task force of united cooks will choose strategies based on best practices and close work with farmers in order to face the real challenge of safeguarding food biodiversity and traditions. The Terra Madre cooks network uses seasonal foods and small-scale products, giving rise to a new gastronomy, which is strong on local varieties and traditions and aims to root itself to places while supporting the local economy.

Report

10.00 ROOM LINGUA MADRE
WOMEN’S RIGHTS AND THE RIGHT TO LAND
The majority of farmers and food growers, particularly in the Global South, are women. Awareness of the crucial role women play in food security and the fight against hunger is growing, but governments and donor countries are still slow to implement concrete actions to remove the inequalities obstructing women from owning land, accessing credit and using the natural resources essential to food production. Denying women equal rights to land means hindering the fight against poverty and the sustainable management of natural resources. With five years left until the deadline to achieve the Millennium Development Goals, this debate wants to help put women’s rights in the center of the discussion on rural development, bringing together farmers from the Global North and South to identify shared issues and come up with shared solutions.
In collaboration with Action Aid Italy and the International Land Coalition.

Report

13.00 ROOM A
MARGINAL AREAS: ARID ZONES
With the development of agriculture, humans began to form permanent settlements, sometimes in places unsuited to such a lifestyle. Despite the aridity of some of our planet’s geographic areas, many people who live in these areas know how to make the most of the selective hospitality of their environment. They cultivate resistant plant species, collect water where available (wells, oases) and move their livestock around seasonally. Nonetheless the balance is delicate and these areas are often the first to feel the effects of environmental, social and economic crises.

Report
Report

13.00 ROOM B
WATER AND NATURAL RESOURCES: THE ROLE OF LOCAL COMMUNITIES
The involvement of local communities in the management of natural resources represents an indispensable tool for their sustainable and enduring use. We must broaden our perspective and consider all kinds of natural resources―forest and non-forest products, water resources, natural fibers and much more―to find effective answers for economic development in response to the challenge of sustainability.

Report

13.00 ROOM C
DIRECT SELL
Putting those who produce food in touch with those who buy is important. It creates solid micro-economies, conveys principles and knowledge and recreates a chain of values that otherwise risks disappearing. As well as helping to provide good, clean and fair food, these value chains represent a system of connections which is positive for all participants and thus offers a better method than the modern distribution system.

Report

13.00 ROOM D
NETWORKS MEET: TERRA MADRE GARDENS
Report

13.00 ROOM E
MARGINAL AREAS: MOUNTAINS
The importance of farming to the conservation of mountains and the revival of mountain life is obvious, but it is incredibly hard to find operational strategies that take into account the distinctive features of mountainous regions. What happens up there always has consequences on lower-lying lands, and preventing these consequences from becoming a landslide (not only in a metaphorical sense) is a shared responsibility.


13.00 ROOM F
SUSTAINABLE PACKAGING AND MARKETING FOR QUALITY PRODUCTS
Packaging provides the first information that triggers the decision process about whether or not to buy the product. Marketing uses packaging to make an impression on potential purchasers. Sustainable packaging is part of the communication of a quality product; it must be reduced to the indispensable minimum and be oriented towards recyclable, biodegradable materials that help communicate the place from where the product comes.


13.00 ROOM G
SUSTAINABLE INNOVATIONS IN FIGHTING HUNGER AND POVERTY
Just at the moment that agricultural development has reached a crossroads, a new generation of innovative approaches to the fight against hunger has revealed itself. Despite the systematic, large-scale attempt to reduce poverty and hunger with the Green Revolution, a considerable percentage of the human family is still starving. The Worldwatch Institute has traveled in sub-Saharan Africa and will meet the Terra Madre communities and other groups to discuss environmentally sustainable ways to relieve world hunger and rural poverty.
Report

13.00 ROOM H
SLOW FOOD’S EDUCATIONAL PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICES
After years of work in the field of food and taste education, Slow Food has been reflecting on its educational style in order to identify its founding principles. The resulting Manifesto for education will be presented in this seminar. Slow Food’s educational actions can be placed within its pedagogical framework, and the operational conditions then worked out collectively. Participants will be asked to help with the collection of practical suggestions to direct the work of those involved in education at Slow Food, with the aim of working together to create an Educators’ Manual.
Report

15.00 ROOM A
FOOD FOR MIND – MIND FOR HEALTH
The IUHPE-CIPES European Centre, in collaboration with the European Commission, the City of Turin, the Italian Minister for Youth and the Italian Ministry for Health, has organized a health promotion initiative which brings together young Europeans for three days of debate about health, with particular emphasis on the relationship between food and well-being from a systemic perspective.

15.00 ROOM B
GEOGRAPHICAL INDICATIONS: ECO-FRIENDLY AGRICULTURE AND RESPECT FOR LOCAL TRADITIONS AND IDENTITIES
Geographical indications can be a tool for development and the definition of places, as long as they are used for products authentically connected to the local area that follow consistent specifications and are protected by constant and participatory controls. European experiences can offer some stories with a happy ending, and can also suggest models that require reform. Models from outside Europe recognize in geographic indications not only opportunities for accessing European markets but also for redesigning agricultural strategies and promoting so-called marginal areas. Alternative instruments also come from these zones, but in each case reciprocal recognition must be discussed.

Report

15.00 ROOM C
AGROBIODIVERSITY AND FOOD SOVEREIGNTY: THE ROLE OF INDIGENOUS PEOPLES
Slow Food has entered into a partnership to strengthen the voice of indigenous groups at a political level and promote their unique wisdom. With the support of the Christensen Fund, the Indigenous Partnership for Agrobiodiversity and Food Sovereignty, is bringing together environmental, biodiversity and indigenous organizations and working with leaders and communities to determine the best way to serve them, respecting their styles of life, their traditional foods and crops, and sharing their fundamental knowledge with other actors in the food system. In collaboration with the Platform for Agrobiodiversity Research (PAR) and Crops for the Future (CFF).
Report
Report

15.00 ROOM D
ORGANIC AND BIODYNAMIC AGRICULTURE
Organic and biodynamic agriculture are on the front line of the fight for environmental sustainability and maintaining soil fertility. Organic farming is focused on crop rotation and organic fertilization and uses no chemical plant protection. Biodynamic principles follow the same lines but also take into account vital forces and aim to cultivate plants and raise animals in harmony with these forces. These eco-compatible production practices are spreading and Terra Madre offers a good opportunity to assess the situation and discuss shared problems.

Report

15.00 ROOM E
BETWEEN LAND AND SEA: SAFEGUARDING THE COASTAL ENVIRONMENT
Coastal areas have long been a meeting place for different communities who work with food and for food. Though they share common needs, farmers and fishers often fight separately to keep their knowledge and traditional economies alive. We must create opportunities for dialog and exchange with the aim of identifying shared problems and possible collaborations. This is the only way to guarantee the survival of coastal economies and identify sustainable methods of food production and consumption.

Report

15.00 ROOM F
WHO OWNS SEEDS?
Patents on living material are still on the margins of the debate in agriculture, but seeds are the focal point for both plant and animal food production. Faced with the excessive power of seed multinationals, profiting from a heritage which for millennia was based on the sharing of knowledge, experiences of participatory varietal improvement and selection indicate an alternative that can also be economically effective. Once again a common good can be protected and defended only by excluding it from the logic of private profit.

Report

15.00 ROOM G
TOURISM FOR DEVELOPMENT
In recent years distances between different geographic areas have been considerably reduced, as people move around with increasing ease. This ease of movement acquires greater importance if it is used for the development of local populations. Tourism projects linked to development can be very useful for communities and provide an enriching experience to a new kind of tourist. In collaboration with Fondazioni4Africa.

Report
Report

15.00 ROOM H
NETWORKS MEET: YOUTH FOOD MOVEMENT


Report
 
 
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